We get a very detailed account of an animal that obviously lived in Job’s times; God calls this creature a Leviathan.

We find the following description from the Creator of the creature (Job 41:1-34):

1 Canst thou draw out leviathan with an hook? or his tongue with a cord which thou lettest down?
 2 Canst thou put an hook into his nose? or bore his jaw through with a thorn?
 3 Will he make many supplications unto thee? will he speak soft words unto thee?
 4 Will he make a covenant with thee? wilt thou take him for a servant for ever?
 5 Wilt thou play with him as with a bird? or wilt thou bind him for thy maidens?
 6 Shall the companions make a banquet of him? shall they part him among the merchants?
 7 Canst thou fill his skin with barbed irons? or his head with fish spears?
 8 Lay thine hand upon him, remember the battle, do no more.
 9 Behold, the hope of him is in vain: shall not one be cast down even at the sight of him?
 10 None is so fierce that dare stir him up: who then is able to stand before me?
 11 Who hath prevented me, that I should repay him? whatsoever is under the whole heaven is mine.
 12 I will not conceal his parts, nor his power, nor his comely proportion.
 13 Who can discover the face of his garment? or who can come to him with his double bridle?
 14 Who can open the doors of his face? his teeth are terrible round about.
 15 His scales are his pride, shut up together as with a close seal.
 16 One is so near to another, that no air can come between them.
 17 They are joined one to another, they stick together, that they cannot be sundered.
 18 By his neesings a light doth shine, and his eyes are like the eyelids of the morning.
 19 Out of his mouth go burning lamps, and sparks of fire leap out.
 20 Out of his nostrils goeth smoke, as out of a seething pot or caldron.
 21 His breath kindleth coals, and a flame goeth out of his mouth.
 22 In his neck remaineth strength, and sorrow is turned into joy before him.
 23 The flakes of his flesh are joined together: they are firm in themselves; they cannot be moved.
 24 His heart is as firm as a stone; yea, as hard as a piece of the nether millstone.
 25 When he raiseth up himself, the mighty are afraid: by reason of breakings they purify themselves.
 26 The sword of him that layeth at him cannot hold: the spear, the dart, nor the habergeon.
 27 He esteemeth iron as straw, and brass as rotten wood.
 28 The arrow cannot make him flee: slingstones are turned with him into stubble.
 29 Darts are counted as stubble: he laugheth at the shaking of a spear.
 30 Sharp stones are under him: he spreadeth sharp pointed things upon the mire.
 31 He maketh the deep to boil like a pot: he maketh the sea like a pot of ointment.
 32 He maketh a path to shine after him; one would think the deep to be hoary.
 33 Upon earth there is not his like, who is made without fear.
 34 He beholdeth all high things: he is a king over all the children of pride.

We also find verses about Leviathan in Psalms (74:14 and 104:26) earlier on in Job (3:8) and Isaiah (27:1).

Is Leviathan a crocodile? No way!

You will find commentary in black and the verses in red.

1 Canst thou draw out leviathan with an hook? or his tongue with a cord which thou lettest down?

God asks Job if he can fish out the Leviathan. We find that the Leviathan obviously lives in the water since there are many references to Leviathan being in the water and being treated like fish.

 2 Canst thou put an hook into his nose? or bore his jaw through with a thorn?
 3 Will he make many supplications unto thee? will he speak soft words unto thee?
 4 Will he make a covenant with thee? wilt thou take him for a servant for ever?
 5 Wilt thou play with him as with a bird? or wilt thou bind him for thy maidens?
 6 Shall the companions make a banquet of him? shall they part him among the merchants?

We know Leviathan was originally created a vegetarian (see Dinosaurs – Vegetarians?) but we find in the above verses that reasoning with this animal and seeing him as safe is a very bad idea. I know I wouldn’t even want to get close enough to touch Leviathan with a 50-foot pole!

 7 Canst thou fill his skin with barbed irons? or his head with fish spears?

Once again we have reference to fishing devices used against the Leviathan. We also learn that Leviathan is a creature of strength and has some sort of protection around his body.

 8 Lay thine hand upon him, remember the battle, do no more.

You might not think this a very poetic verse but I do. This verse makes it very clear that to stay away from a Leviathan is a very, very good idea. If God protects you than you will get away with your life but you wouldn’t dare pull it off again!

9 Behold, the hope of him is in vain: shall not one be cast down even at the sight of him?
 10 None is so fierce that dare stir him up: who then is able to stand before me?

More evidence of this ferocious creature God tells us about!

11 Who hath prevented me, that I should repay him? whatsoever is under the whole heaven is mine.
 12 I will not conceal his parts, nor his power, nor his comely proportion.
 13 Who can discover the face of his garment? or who can come to him with his double bridle?
 14 Who can open the doors of his face? his teeth are terrible round about.

Even the most strong bridle could not tame this beast. We find that calm will not tame this creature (2-6) and we find that force will not lead it into compliance either!

 15 His scales are his pride, shut up together as with a close seal.
 16 One is so near to another, that no air can come between them.
 17 They are joined one to another, they stick together, that they cannot be sundered.
 18 By his neesings a light doth shine, and his eyes are like the eyelids of the morning.

We learn a very interesting thing about Leviathan in these verses. Leviathan possesses scales, a very distinct feature of reptiles. The reference to his scales being so close together that “no air can come between them” is very important for Leviathan (at least we know he is not an amphibian). It is also a very important feature in creatures that live in deep water.

If Leviathan was a Plesiosaurus or a Liopleurodon then he would need waterproof skin. If he had scales like God says he does than the life of a Leviathan would be perfect in the water, just like Pliosaurs.

 19 Out of his mouth go burning lamps, and sparks of fire leap out.
 20 Out of his nostrils goeth smoke, as out of a seething pot or caldron.
 21 His breath kindleth coals, and a flame goeth out of his mouth.
 22 In his neck remaineth strength, and sorrow is turned into joy before him.

Now, this is where a evolutionist would stop and yell, “Timeout! Dinosaurs, especially ones that live in the water, do not breath fire!”

Would you guess that the electric eel can actually emit 300-365 volts of electricity under water?!

Most animals produce flammable gases, all Leviathan would need is a way to light it.

 23 The flakes of his flesh are joined together: they are firm in themselves; they cannot be moved.
 24 His heart is as firm as a stone; yea, as hard as a piece of the nether millstone.
 25 When he raiseth up himself, the mighty are afraid: by reason of breakings they purify themselves.
 26 The sword of him that layeth at him cannot hold: the spear, the dart, nor the habergeon.
 27 He esteemeth iron as straw, and brass as rotten wood.
 28 The arrow cannot make him flee: slingstones are turned with him into stubble.
 29 Darts are counted as stubble: he laugheth at the shaking of a spear.
 30 Sharp stones are under him: he spreadeth sharp pointed things upon the mire.

It is amazing how many times God refers to the impenetrability of Leviathan. His words “iron as straw”, “brass as rotten wood”,  and “sword of him . . . cannot hold: the spear, the dart nor the habergeon” (habergeon is a word for a man’s armor, not even man’s armor could stand to Leviathan).

 31 He maketh the deep to boil like a pot: he maketh the sea like a pot of ointment.
 32 He maketh a path to shine after him; one would think the deep to be hoary.
 33 Upon earth there is not his like, who is made without fear.
 34 He beholdeth all high things: he is a king over all the children of pride.

Could Leviathan make fire underneath the water like verse 31 suggests? Possibly, remember the electric eel we talked about?

We find in this passage of scripture a creature that we do not associate ourselves with today. Either he is extinct or we just haven’t found him, but the evidence points to Leviathan either being a kind of Pliosaur (maybe a Kronosaurus) or a creature that we have never found the bones of!

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Related Articles:

Pliosaurs: Leviathan vs. Kronosaurus

Profile: Kronosaurus 

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